Scottish Wild Salmon Company
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Press Release – Scottish Wild Salmon Company Acquires Ythan Estuary Salmon Angling And Salmon Netting Rights

Scottish Wild Salmon Company (Usan Salmon Fisheries Ltd) has today announced it has acquired angling and salmon netting rights in the Ythan estuary and adjacent foreshore.

Commenting, George Pullar, director said 'We are absolutely delighted to have acquired these splendid sea trout and salmon fishing rights. Given our long association with wild salmon and sea trout in Scotland, we look forward to managing these long established rights, in a sustainable manner, working in partnership with the angling community to open up access opportunities for anglers of all ages and backgrounds. We believe that salmon angling should be open to all members of society. To that end, the angling fishery will continue to be open to the public going forward from this year.

Some limited netting may be required on the foreshore and lower estuary. We are committed to helping, through our board levy, to return the Ythan to its former glory, in a bid to ensure that it remains one of the top sea trout rivers in Scotland for future generations. The average sea trout catch over the last 5 years has been just under 1000 per annum from the Newburgh fishings a credible baseline.

We will continue to employ local staff in our operations, supporting rural communities and contributing to the economy. A website containing all the information and booking contact details for the Ythan angling fishery is currently in place at http://www.ythanangling.net.

George Pullar

Editor's Notes

Scottish Wild Salmon Company is a brand name of Usan Salmon Fisheries Ltd. The company primarily owns salmon netting rights on the North and East coast of Scotland as well as in the Moray Firth. Established in the 1960s, the indigenous Scottish company remains one of the last salmon netting operations in Scotland. It is also a member of the Salmon Net Fishing Association of Scotland, with its directors sitting on the Executive Council from time to time.

The company has a reputation for harvesting one of Scotland's finest products and making this available to domestic customers in Scotland and the wider UK as well as exporting Scottish Wild Salmon all over Europe. The matchless reputation of Scottish Wild Salmon has been further secured by the award of Protected Geographic Indication (PGI) becoming an EU Protected Food Name.

Scottish Wild Salmon Company is committed to evidence based sustainability measures and works tirelessly to ensure the future preservation of this long standing way of life, one steeped, in centuries of Scottish rural tradition. Further details can be found at http://www.usansalmon.com.

Matthew Chance reports on how climate change is shrinking the size of wild salmon off the Scottish coast for CNN



Fishery business feels sting of explosion in jellyfish numbers

AN EXPLOSION in jellyfish numbers is threatening the viability of an Angus fishery business. Usan Salmon Fisheries near Montrose has been blighted by an sharp increase in the invertebrates following an unexplained summer influx around the UK.

Director George Pullar claimed the nuisance is only adding to the woes of fishermen already struggling with "outdated" legislation, the effects of climate change and increasingly unpredictable weather.

Nets used for catching fresh fish are being clogged with jellyfish as their numbers soar from John o' Groats to the English Channel. Experts at the Marine Conservation Society have suggested the sudden expansion could be down to the recent hike in temperatures.

Usan Salmon Fisheries Latest News Jellyfish

Mr Pullar took some photographs of his unwanted haul after taking to sea last week. He said numbers have been on the increase over the last few years, but nothing compares to this year's mass appearance. "The effects the jellyfish have on our business are profound," Mr Pullar said."They effectively choke our nets, rendering them inoperable and present a significant health and safety issue for our crew."Quite apart from the more obvious sting hazards, they are extremely heavy, particularly in large volumes and represent a huge logistical challenge in terms of moving, handling and cleaning our fishing gear."

A 10-year survey of jellyfish had noted a quiet year until the start of June when sightings began to stack up. Several species including the Lion's Mane, which is capable of a powerful sting, are being reported in rapidly growing numbers off the Angus coast.

Mr Pullar said his crew are struggling to cope with pulling in the additional load and the subsequent mess while trying to maintain a living."When you consider that each jellyfish could weigh 12kg and multiply this by the hundreds we see in our nets at any given time, you start to get an idea of the scale of the problem."This has the unfortunate knock-on effect of making it incredibly difficult for us to comply with the outdated Weekly Close Time legislation, when we have to remove our salmon net leaders by 6pm on a riday."These regulations simply take no account of the wide range of environmental factors we have to contend with when running our business."

There are competing views on the increasing numbers of jellyfish, with some evidence pointing to pollution which drives up algae and deprives the seas of oxygen. Those conditions spell bad news for shellfish but allow jellyfish to thrive. Some scientists say the phenomenon is a natural 20-year cycle that continually sees the rapid growth and die-off of jellyfish. By Graeme Bletcher - The Courier - August 12, 2013

Scottish Wild Salmon Continues Conservation Efforts – Sea Trout 2013 and 2014

As part of our continuing commitment to conservation, we have agreed, for the next 2 years to release all healthy sea trout caught in our operation in the South Esk Fishery District, near Montrose. This initiative extends the arrangement which has been in place for the last three years. As a result, we will have no sea trout on sale to customers this year from this area. We will however, be able to offer customers sea trout caught from our other fishing stations on the North Coast and Moray Firth. David Pullar said 'While customers may be disappointed that no sea trout caught from the South Esk Fishery District, are available for sale again this year, we very much hope they will respect our willingness to be involved in conservation initiatives, aimed at ensuring an increasing abundance for the future. Customers can be assured that sea trout caught from our remaining stations in other areas of Scotland, will be offered for sale.'

Scottish Wild Salmon Continues Conservation Efforts – Early Spring Salmon 2013 and 2014 – South Esk District Only – 16 February to 30 April

Continuing our comprehensive commitment to conservation, we have agreed, for the next 2 years to refrain from netting from 16 February to 30 April at our Usan operation in the South Esk Fishery District, near Montrose. This initiative extends the arrangement which has been in place for the last eight years. As a result, we will have no salmon on sale to customers, during this period, from this area. We will however, be able to offer customers salmon caught from our other fishing stations on the North Coast and Moray Firth. David Pullar said 'While customers may be disappointed that no salmon caught from the South Esk Fishery District, are available until after 30 April, we very much hope they will respect our willingness to be involved in conservation initiatives, aimed at responding to perceived concerns over the early spring stock component in the South Esk. Customers can be assured that salmon caught from our remaining stations in other areas of Scotland during this period, will be offered for sale.'

Scottish Wild Salmon Company Engages New Modern ApprenticeScottish Wild Salmon Company - Sean Massie - Apprentice

Being a family firm, Scottish Wild Salmon Company has long valued the importance of passing on the traditional skills and crafts associated with Scottish Coastal Salmon Netting. In keeping with this, the company is pleased to announce that shortly it will be taking on its first Modern Apprentice, Sean Massie.

Sean said 'I see this as a fantastic opportunity to learn first-hand about the unique business of coastal salmon fishing. Not only will I be able to learn the wide range of practical skills involved, but a proportion of college based work provides an academic foundation to complement this. This will set me up for a career in a pretty specialised business'.

David Pullar, Director of Scottish Wild Salmon Company said 'We are absolutely delighted to be able to offer this valuable position to Sean. In these times of economic austerity it's great to be able to provide opportunities for young people. It's particularly pleasing to allow them to be part of the Scottish Salmon Netting industry, which is steeped in centuries of tradition and continues to hold a valuable place in Scotland's rich rural heritage'.

Scottish Wild Salmon Company - PGI LogoScottish Wild Salmon Netters Persue Quality and Gain Prestigious Award

The Salmon Net Fishing Association of Scotland, (SNFAS) industry body and representative for the majority of Scottish Salmon Netters, today announced it has been successful in having Scottish Wild Salmon awarded Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status being recognised as an EU Protected Food Name.

The application process, which has been underway for over 2 years, has now been completed, with the appropriate regulation coming into force within 3 weeks. Chairman of SNFAS, James Mackay said ‘We are delighted that the finest of indigenous Scottish produce, Scottish Wild Salmon, has been awarded this distinguished accreditation. We are keen for the distinctive nature and quality of the salmon to be preserved for consumers and that is the reason why we have pursued this renowned benchmark.

The salmon and indeed our long established Scottish industry, with its traditional skills and crafts, should be safeguarded for future generations to enjoy as part of Scotland’s proud heritage. The award of PGI status provides long overdue recognition for both the salmon and the few remaining Scottish salmon netters.

The Scottish Wild Salmon continues to be one of the most sought after food sources world-wide, a fact borne out by the strength of both our domestic and world markets.

We wish to thank the Scottish Government, EU and DEFRA for their support during the application process’.

George Pullar, a Director of Scottish Wild Salmon Company Ltd said 'It is excellent news that Scottish Wild Salmon has been recognised in this way and we are thrilled with this worthy achievement. PGI accreditation is fitting for a product of such unequalled quality and uniqueness. Using the logo, in conjunction with our distinctive branded security carcass tags, customers around the world will be further protected from cheap poor quality imitations, offering further assurance that they are buying the very finest Scottish produce.'

Editors Notes

The Salmon Net Fishing Association of Scotland was established in Aberdeen in 1906 by owners and lessees of salmon fishings on the east coast of Scotland, and is Scotland’s oldest fishermen’s organisation. The Association’s objectives include defending, protecting and advancing the interests of salmon net fishing in Scotland, encouraging scientific research, and rendering assistance to those engaged in this work. Further details can be found at http://scottishsalmonassoc.net/

Ownership of Salmon Fishing Rights

All rights of salmon fishing in Scotland, whether in fresh water or in the sea, are held as private, heritable titles. Originally all owned by the Crown, over the years many have been conveyed to individuals by written Crown grants, and may be bought, sold or leased. Thus, today’s netsmen are either owners or tenants of the fisheries they operate.

Scottish Wild Salmon Company in the news:
The links below contain detailed full colour features on Scottish Wild Salmon Company, that have been carried in mainstream newspapers

- Bag net fishing returns to Gardenstown
- Challenging environment is the backdrop to Scottish Wild Salmon Company

Scottish Wild Salmon Company Continues Conservation Efforts – Sea Trout 2012

As part of our continuing commitment to conservation, Usan Salmon have again agreed this year to release all healthy sea trout caught in its operation in the South Esk Fishery District, near Montrose. This initiative extends the arrangement which has been in place for the last two years. As a result, we will have no sea trout on sale to customers this year from this area. We will however, be able to offer customers sea trout caught from our other fishing stations on the North Coast and Moray Firth. David Pullar said 'While customers may be disappointed that no sea trout caught from the South Esk Fishery District, are available for sale this year, we very much hope they will respect our willingness to be involved in conservation initiatives, aimed at ensuring an increasing abundance for the future. Customers can be assured that sea trout caught from our remaining stations in other areas of Scotland, will be offered for sale. Of course, as normal, salmon from our various fisheries, will continue to be available for their enjoyment.'

Scottish Wild Salmon Company Keeps Tradition Alive

As customers will know, Usan is justifiably proud of the ancient tradition of salmon netting in Scotland. In a bold move, we have recently acquired two further existing salmon stations. These are located at Murkle/Castlehill on the North Coast and Gardenstown in the Moray Firth. George Pullar said 'We are delighted to secure these long established netting stations. To have the rights on the North Coast is a particular pleasure as these were fisheries our Father leased from the Crown Estate when we were children. Owning them now really represents a return to our roots. My nephews now operate these fishings for us and it is great to be able to continue the family business, support Scottish regional employment and safeguard Scottish netting for future generations'.

Marine Scotland Science Collaboration

Scottish Wild Salmon Company is pleased to announce that it is working in collaboration with Scottish Government Marine Scientists over a 3 year period from 2012 to facilitate the capture, sampling, radio tagging and release of a number of salmon from its base of operations in the South Esk Fishery District. It is hoped that the project will provide valuable information on fish movements and migratory behaviour. George Pullar said 'It's exciting to be intrinsically involved with something we are passionate about. We have long argued that stock management decisions need to be taken on the basis of robust evidence, rather than conjecture. We are positive about the future both for ourselves and salmon as a species and to be directly engaged in research which will feed into future management is very rewarding personally. I believe, all parties involved in salmon management should welcome the action being led by Scottish Government in the South Esk area'. Details can be found at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/marine/science/Research/Freshwater/SoutEskProject

 
     
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